How to Screw Into Concrete

Concrete is mostly used for every home nowadays. They are strong, sturdy, and durable, that is why they are a popular choice for every household. But because of the strength and sturdiness of the concrete, it is relatively hard to penetrate, making some things hard to do, like installing fasteners upon these walls.

To help you with that, here are some tips for drilling concrete and installing screws:

Buy a variety of screw lengths

Buying a wide range of screw lengths is always recommended so that you’ll have more chance of getting the correct screw size. Select a screw that can easily penetrate one inch into the wall. To do this, measure the material’s thickness and then add one inch to it. For hard and dense materials, like stone and concrete, an inch screw embedment will work just fine. But if you want to opt for maximum strength, a screw embedment of 1 and ¾ inches will give the best support. 

Use a hammer drill

In some less sturdy materials like soft bricks, you can easily drill holes using a carbide-tipped bit in a regular drill. But in most cases, you will need a hammer drill. Hammer drills are known for their power to drill holes, even the toughest of materials.

Drill with a firm hand and maintain steady pressure

A good technique is always important when it comes to driving concrete screws. If you don’t maintain your pressure, even a slight downward force can halt the bit and slip off the head, especially if you are using Phillips head screws. For best results, maintain your pressure on the screw and run the drill at slow speed and gradually increasing it to medium speed.

Make sure to drill the hole deep enough

When you drill a hole for your screws, you want it to be stable as much as possible. That is why you need to drill the hole deep enough for your screws for the maximum anchor. Holes for concrete screws usually should be at least ¼ inches deeper than the depth of the screw penetration to allow a little bit room for dust accumulation from the drilling process. But this process is not that easy, as judging the depth of the hole from the outside is not that easy. What you need to do is to drill bit by bit and put the screw inside to try it out. If the hole is too shallow, the screw will not go in completely. If the screw fits perfectly, penetrate the hole a little more to get that extra space allowance. 

Choose 3/16-inch screws for most light to medium tasks

Home centers and hardware shops often stock concrete screws in two different diameters: 3/16 inches and ¼ inches. The 3/16-inch diameter screws are popularly used for installing furring strips, screwing down walls and concrete floors, and even attaching hardware to block or brick. The 3/16-inch screws are often seen as the better choice, as it demands smaller holes, and it is relatively cheaper. But if you are having trouble with it snapping off because the concrete is too hard, it is time to switch to 1/4-inch screws.

How to Fix Crumbling Concrete Driveways

Crumbling concrete driveways are caused by concrete spalling – one of the most inconvenient problems those with concrete driveways will experience. Since concrete driveways are exposed to various elements like rain, flooding, and the weight of the car going in and out of the driveway, it is susceptible to damage. Spalling is like a ripple on a large pond caused by a small drop of water. If left untreated, the surrounding concrete also crumbles, which causes further damage to the driveway. 

That’s why spalling should be fixed and patched up before it worsens. And so, how do we fix crumbling concrete driveways before it gets worse? This post will help you solve that problem.

Here’s how to do it:

1. Determine the problem areas

The process of fixing the crumbled concrete driveway begins by determining the problem areas. If it has minor damage, then you can do it yourself. Otherwise, call a professional to fix your driveway.

2. Check if it’s the ideal weather to fix the driveway

If the weather’s going to be sunny or rainy, then postpone it to another day. For the concrete to achieve its full strength, you should patch up your driveway during clear weather.

3. If you plan to do it yourself, start by thoroughly cleaning the working area

The patching process begins by making sure the working area is cleaned. Remove the crumbled concrete, and sweep off the dust and foreign materials. You can also use a pressure washer to blast off difficult-to-remove dirt. If you used a pressure washer, make sure the area dries first before proceeding.

4. Prepare the concrete mixture

While the driveway pavement is drying after the pressure washing, prepare the concrete mixture. Be sure to use concrete with high strength to make it long-lasting. Before mixing, make sure the water ratio is enough to make it have a consistency similar to peanut butter. Then, mix it on a cement mixer, a wheelbarrow, or an area you readied so that you can mix concrete by shovel.

5. Fill the damaged area with concrete

Use a shovel to fill the damaged area with the concrete mixture. Using a trowel, make sure to even the surface to the driveway’s elevation. Let it dry for a few hours, then apply the second concrete coating. However, the second coating should have a wetter consistency for a smoother finish.

6. Use a concrete finishing broom

Using a concrete finishing broom is a must, since it will give the newly patched driveway area a non-skid surface, which is essential to prevent problems while driving. Make sure to drag the finishing broom in a direction along the width of the driveway. 

With this, you can patch up your crumbling concrete driveway with no need for a professional’s help! However, if the damaged area is too big or you also have a unique design for the pavement, it’s much better to let the professionals deal with the problem. Hopefully, this post has helped you do so. If it did, then please don’t hesitate to share it with others!

How Much Does It Cost to Put in a Sprinkler System?

Among the multitude of modern inventions and technological innovations within the last few centuries, the automated sprinkler system is one that has most definitely been put to good use across residential and commercial areas alike. Manually watering your lawn or green space with a good old garden hose has been rendered relatively obsolete thanks to the wonders of the sprinkler system.

Since these contraptions are so massively important and unequivocally helpful for all the homeowners out there looking towards enjoying a hassle-free irrigation experience, you may be on the lookout for the sprinkler system for you. You may be wondering about the price point that you should come to expect. In that case, you’ve come to the right place!

Factors that can affect sprinkler system

In order for you to much better understand the estimation of how much of your hard-earned savings will be dedicated to putting in a brand-new sprinkler system, let’s discuss a few things that can factor into the price. All of these factors, you can already take into consideration and ponder about as you go and read this post.

Property Size

As the logic goes; the larger the space, the bigger the cost! Especially for particularly large property sizes that are in different vertical heights or have a variety of plant life and sections in the area, several exclusive zones will have to be created.

The more zones, the more piping you’ll use. That’ll cost money. The more zones, the better sprinkler system controller you’ll need—which will also cost you more money.

Perhaps the best way to begin thinking about the cost of a new sprinkler system is taking into consideration the sheer size of the property you’re dealing with.

Soil Condition

As has been said before, different plant life in different sections of the property can be a cause for additional and more specified zones. The condition of the soil, which refers to the composition and components that make up the soil on your lawn, will be a strong decider of what kind of sprinkler head you will be needing to avail in the first place.

Landscaping and Gardening

Whatever plant life is present in your garden or lawn—whether it’s a bunch of shrubbery, a bed of flowers, or a plot of vegetable stalks—you’re going to have to specify the materials, such as the specific piping or sprinkler heads and nozzles, that make up your sprinkler system to better accommodate the needs of your greenery.

The Cost

Now is the dreaded talk: how much does it really cost? Well, that will depend on a lot of things—a lot more than what has been mentioned above gives us a workable estimation of an average $2,461, with the cheapest gunning for $409 and the most expensive running at around $4,900.

But of course, if this appears to be too hefty of a price for you, fear not! You already have all the tools you need to make the budget fit into what you can afford. Think and re-examine your budget according to those aforementioned factors and you’ll surely find a way to make the price work for you.

How to Fix Hairline Cracks in Stucco

If you see a hairline crack on your exterior stucco wall, it is very important to repair this stucco crack as soon as possible to prevent further damage. Even if they are just hairline cracks, you may want to call your local stucco repairman or apply a repair caulk in the crack to prevent future damage. This kind of crack in your stucco wall is considered a minor issue and you can apply do-it-yourself repair techniques that can assist you to get the job done properly. 

Getting Started 

Before doing any repair, you must evaluate the severity of the crack first. In order to do this, use a scraper to enlarge one of the hairline cracks. If you find out that it’s not really deep and it only exists on the surface, then no need to worry as fixing this type of crack is quite simple. What you should really avoid is the type of crack that runs deep through the plater towards the wall as these cracks are deeper and more serious. Now, let’s go over the actual process on how to fix hairline cracks in the stucco. But before that, let’s check what they actually look like. 

What Hairline Cracks Look Like 

A hairline crack is an ultra-small and often, a shallow surface crack within a wall crafted from stucco. It is as thick as a single strand of hair. Often described as a crack because it is shallow. In order to learn how to fit this, it is essential to know how they are formed as these cracks happen for many reasons. 

The plasters used to construct the exterior wall was not mixed properly.

The home is settling due to vibration. When there is remodeling or renovation in the home, vibrations that occur because of other repairs installations may result in hairline cracks to develop. This can happen even when the stucco was applied according to the highest standards, well-experienced professionals.

The stucco was covered by another layer of a coat of paint while it was still 

The worker who was stuccoing the wall stopped working at a specific spot each day. Professional contractors prevent these types of cracks by changing the spot where they stop the stucco installation process every workday. By doing so, they can lessen the risk of developing hairline cracks. 

Hairline Cracks In Stucco Repair Tips

Now, let’s discuss how to fix hairline cracks in stucco and the simplest process to handle repairs of these very shallow cracks. 

It is recommended to do your repair work in the morning. As we know due to proper lighting, it is easier to fill cracks in the morning. Aside from lighting, you may want to time when the house is cooler so better work in the morning than in the afternoon when the sun is up. When the house is cooler, it makes the crack more visible than when it is warmer. It is easier to spot and fill them in. Cool house leads to a contraction that opens up small cracks in stucco. 

Clean The Wall Before Repairing

Before repairing the wall crack, remove the dirt and dust from the stucco. When the wall is clean beforehand, it will have a clean and smooth texture that paint adheres to easily. After washing, you may fill in the cracks with a little dab of caulking or spackling. 

Afterward, you can repaint the wall for a smooth and clean finish. It is advisable to paint it right after washing and caulking to prevent water from entering the stucco wall. Paint can definitely seal the tiniest holes or pores. Additionally, small cracks may be painted over to bridge the space that crosses the crack. 

These types of slim cracks can be painted with thick or three coats of water-based and textured paint. This type of paint works well with cracks. 

How to Hang Lights on Stucco

String lights can make a world of difference to your outdoor space. It exudes a certain vibe making your ambiance more relaxing and welcoming. In some houses or condominiums, patio lights are becoming staples as they provide a vintage touch to your apartments, house backyards, or even cafes. 

However, with the presence of your stucco wall siding, hanging these fancy lights seem to be challenging. You may initially think of grabbing a box of nails to hammer these on the wall but before you do something that you might regret, let’s read on the ways on how to safely hang outdoor lights on your stucco wall without causing any damage. 

You have to properly secure the lights without causing damage to the exterior of your house. Take note that the uneven, coarse texture of stucco makes some adhesives ineffective. To deal with this challenging surface, there are some crafting tools you can use to attach your lights and remove them without damaging your stucco. If your finish is made with EIFS or Exterior Insulation Finishing System, you may even have an option to permanently install tools like light clips if you are planning to hang and remove your lights every now and then. 

GLUE GUN METHOD 

  1. Get the glue gun and load the glue stick into it. Plug the glue gun into the nearest power outlet. If the area where you are planning to hang the lights is quite far from where the glue gun is plugged, you may need to use an extension cord. 
  1. Go to the spot where your string lights will end and using a ladder, climb while holding your lights, and a glue gun. Hold the end of the string light with one hand against the wall. Align the nozzle of the glue gun near the light cord and pull the trigger in order to put a glob of glue onto the cord and wall. Be careful not to touch the hot glue. 
  1. Allow the glue to dry and harden by holding and pressing the cord against the wall for about 20 to 30 seconds. Then work on the next spot about 18 inches away from the starting point. Repeat step 2 by adding another glob of hot glue. Keep repeating the process for every 18 inches along with the string lights until you reach the end. 

Permanent Clips Method

  1. Determine the spaces between each light bulb on your string lights by measuring them. This will determine the right spacing for the light clips. 
  1. Put the ladder in the spot where your lights will end. Climb on the ladder while holding the caulk gun loaded with construction adhesive. 
  1. Go to the roofline or spot where the lights will go. Put a  quarter-sized dab of adhesive directly on the stucco exterior surface. 
  1. Place the flat edge of the mounting clip into the adhesive. Hold and press it firmly for about a few seconds to ensure that it sticks strongly. Repeat this process on every mounting clip, making sure that the clip spacing equals the bulb spacing on the light string. Once you’re done, it’s time to attach the light bulbs into each mounting clips. 

How to Cut Stucco

How to Cut Stucco

Stucco provides a solid and good looking covering to the exterior of your home. But, there may come a time that you need to make some changes in your house that may require you to cut your stucco wall. 

There are a few different processes to cut through the stucco. Being familiar with different tools, blades, and equipment will help to properly cut through all kinds of stucco plaster. 

The Right Tools

There are a few different tools you can use to cut through the stucco wall. One of the main tools is a diamond blade or a carbide-tipped blade. These tools make a clean cut through the stucco. Firstly, you must choose the saw that is perfect for your needs. 

What You’ll Need

There are a few different tools you can use to cut stucco. You can use a diamond blade or a carbide-tipped blade in order to make a clean cut through the stucco. Firstly, choose the saw that’s best for your needs:

  • Circular saw – good for cutting a large area
  • Angle grinder – great for virtually all purposes
  • Oscillating tool- good for smaller cuts and detailed work
  • Power drill with a hole saw attachment -great for cutting circular holes

After identifying the best saw for your project, you’ll need these tools on hand as well:

  • Painter’s tape 
  • Work gloves
  • Shop-vac 
  • Respirator 
  • Safety goggles 
  • A helper 

Step 1: Set up the work area 

Before you begin cutting, prepare the area where you will be working to maximize efficiency and avoid accidents. 

You can place painter’s tape around the perimeter of the hole you’re going to be cutting. Since stucco is prone to chips and cracks, taping off the perimeter will help lessen the possibility that you damage the good stucco in the vicinity area as you work.

Step 2: Prepare the shop vacuum 

Cutting through Stucco results in so much dust in the area that could sometimes blur you while working. Having a helper and a shop vacuum can help to manage the dust, making it easier to see your work. It is also important for you and your helper to wear respirators to protect you both from breathing any airborne dust particles. 

You should also make sure that your shop vacuum is totally clean. Otherwise, your vacuum will be ineffective in pulling the dust from your workplace as it will just spit it all out on the other side of the vacuum. 

Step 3: Cutting the stucco 

When you are ready for the actual cutting, it is also important to know what you need to do depending on the kind of say you’re using. 

Circular Saw

Circular saw is perfect when cutting larger sections. It doesn’t work well with small cuts that required detailed work.

Make sure you are wearing the proper protective gear like safety goggles and gloves for safety before cutting the walls. 

Push the blade guard back of your circular saw and turn it on. Before starting to cut, wait until it reaches full RPM. Finally, make your first cut with the circular saw. Work slowly and carefully to lessen the change of chipping or cracking the stucco. Continue until you’ve reached the edge of where you are cutting and repeat the process if necessary. 

Angle Grinder

An angle grinder is powerful enough to cut large surfaces and is also useful in smaller cuts as well.

Allow your angle grinder to reach its full RPM as you switch it on. Plunge the blade into the surface of what you’re cutting. 

Oscillating Tool

An oscillating tool is a good choice for smaller cuts and detailed work. Just keep in mind that the blades tend to clog as you work.

Switch the oscillating tool, turn the tool on and allow it to reach full RPM. Then,  slowly plunge the blade into the stucco. 

Using a Hole Saw

A power drill with a hole saw bit is best for a circular hole. Load the bit into your drill and tighten it in place. Switch the trigger and allow it to reach full RPM before beginning your cut.

Why My AC Unit Makes Loud Noise When Starting?

Air conditioners nowadays are quieter than ever. It is now incorporated with sound-dampening technology to minimize the noise it makes. So if you here some unusual noises coming from your air conditioner while you’re normally using it, don’t ignore them, as it could indicate some mild to serious problems. 

Ignoring the noises you hear from your AC unit can turn minor issues into the major, as these mysterious noises can mean that it is needing some tune-up to costly repairs or worst, replacement of the whole unit. The sooner you find and resolve your AC unit problems, the better.

Here are some common noises your AC unit could make and what they may indicate:

Banging

Banging is surely a sign of a loosely-attached or broken part; it’s either a connecting rod, piston pin, or crankshaft, inside the air conditioning compressor. It could also indicate that your indoor blower is unbalanced. A banging sound may also indicate that your compressor needs replacement. 

Clanking

Clanking is another sound that might indicate a loose or unbalanced part. The parts inside the unit have likely failed, and the compressor might become loose, signaling that it may need replacement. This noise may also mean that the indoor blower and the outer fans and its blades are unbalanced and maybe hitting other parts. Ignoring this may cause bigger problems.

Clicking

The clicking sound of your electrical components during start-ups and shutdowns are completely normal. But if the clicking sound persists, it may signal a bigger problem. It could either be a sign of a defective control or a problematic thermostat. In general, it could be any electrical component in your unit. It is vital to address this problem quickly because it can spark bigger problems in the future.

Buzzing

A buzzing sound can mean a lot of things. It could either be caused by loose parts that vibrate as the unit runs, debris inside or outside of the unit, a loose or failing outdoor fan, or loose or unbalanced blades. It could also be coming from misplaced copper wires, untidy condenser coil or the air filter needs replacement. In some cases, it could indicate that the blower is out of balance or it could be from refrigerant leaking.

Squealing

Squeals, squeaks, and rattles are usually coming from blowers and fans. They are usually transmitting these sounds when they are running bad. The blower wheel and housing will also have this noise when it’s malfunctioning. However, this noise is normal during start-ups. Try to identify if this noise was something normal or something new.

Humming

A humming sound generally isn’t serious, but it still signals that something inside your air conditioner is off. Loose parts and refrigerant piping can cause vibration and, if left unchecked, can lead to a more serious maintenance issue. Sometimes humming or buzzing noises point to electrical problems. If the compressor hums and refuses to start, there may be an issue with the motor, though loose wiring could trigger this noise, too.

If you hear something unusual from your AC unit, turn it off before some thorough inspection. If you can’t do it on your own, it’s better to call for diagnostic services. Repairing your AC unit may cost you a bunch, but it’s always the best thing to do to save you from future problems. I hope you learned something that will help you from your AC unit struggles.

How Much Does it Cost to Repair HVAC

Air conditioning units are essential nowadays for our comfort and to make our home more livable. But just like any other home equipment and appliances, your HVAC system also needs maintenance and repairs. And when things get out-of-hand, your best move is to find a repairman. Although it’ll cost you some, rest assured that your HVAC system will be running smoothly again in no time. To give you some ideas about costs and rates, here are some estimates of how much you may spend on your HVAC repair:

HVAC Contractors

To get your HVAC repaired, you’ll need a contractor. Most of them have rates ranging from $75 to $200, and have an hourly rate ranging from $100 to $150. If you need to optimize your budget, choose a contractor that you can afford. It is better if you have a trusted HVAC contractor that already did repairs for you, so that you may have a chance to get discounts.

Diagnostic and Tune-up Rates

To avoid making false assumptions on what really is the problem, it is best to run a diagnostic test on your HVAC to see and identify what really is the problem. It will cost at a range of $85 to $110. But if you think that your HVAC unit just needs a little bit of tuning up, it will cost you around $100.

Flat-Rate Charges 

Flat rates are often offered by HVAC contractors for small repair jobs. It is designed to help you save money because flat rates don’t change even if the job took more time than expected. If you think that your HVAC needs just a little work, this is the best choice for you.

Annual Service Cost

Annual services save you from the hassle emergency repairs bring. It includes one or two tune-ups and refilling of refrigerant, heating, cleaning, AC adjustment. If some parts are needed for replacement, it’ll cost you some extra, but most of the time, annual services cost ranges from $150 to $300. It may need some scheduling, but you might be granted some discounts when it comes to service repairs.

Emergency Service and Repairs Cost

At some point, just like any other household equipment, your HVAC breaks down. Usually, emergency services cost more than regular services. Some low-cost contractors charge an extra $40 to $80, while some high-end contractors charge from $400 to $600. 

Individual Parts Prices

If the diagnostic test already identified what was faulty and you want to focus there, here are some price estimates on how much you’ll need to prepare.

  1. Air-conditioner

Typically, an AC service or repair costs around $320. If your air-conditioner has some serious specific problems that require replacements of some parts or refrigerant recharge, it’ll cost more depending on what part was needed to be repaired or replaced.

  1. Furnace

A furnace is also a vital part of your HVAC system. For furnace diagnostics, it will cost you around $90, while repair services will cost about $100 to $150 per hour. Replacement and repairs will cost an extra depending on the parts needed to be replaced or fixed.

  1. HVAC Duet

Among all other elements and parts of your HVAC system, this would be the cheapest and easiest to maintain. It will only cost you around $2 to $4 per linear foot for repair, while it will cost about $35 to $55 per linear foot of replacement. 

If you need some estimates on your HVAC repair or services, don’t hesitate to call your trusted contractor for some estimates. The prices stated about were made to give you an idea of how much it usually costs and help you especially if you are on a tight budget. We hope we’ve helped you! Good luck on financially preparing for your repair services.

How to Repair AC Duct Work

Air-conditioning units are a must-have to greatly improve your home environment and air quality. While we enjoy having good-quality air from our AC unit, they tend to wear out at some point, and eventually break down. Just like any other appliance and home equipment, your AC needs some repairs and maintenance too.

As your AC breaks, one of the most common problems is its ductwork. Most ductwork problems are leaks, causing your electricity costs to go up, waste energy, pressure imbalances, mold, rot, moisture problems, and comfort complaints. To give you some help, here are some tips:

Inspect for Air Leaks 

In doing this, you need to grab your basic tools. Get your screwdriver and a flashlight. You’ll also need to get some HVAC aluminum foil tape or mastic sealant for patching up some leaks. Don’t forget to dress appropriately for the job, as you’ll get your clothes dirty while doing these. For your safety, wear rubber gloves.

Main Unit

You must first check the main unit and its large ducts (which are connected to your branch ducts). One side of the duct system blows air through the branch ducts, while the other pulls air. 

Turn your HVAC system around and feel around all air ducts and its connections to check for any leak. Try wetting your hand for more sensitivity to enhance your ability to detect leaks. You can also use a sponge and a dishwashing soap and put some bubbles onto suspected areas. If the bubbles move, there’s a great chance that there’s a leak. 

Branch Ducts

The areas where your ducts are visible should be inspected next (this could be in your basement or your attic). Check the insulation surrounding your ducts for any damage, mold, torn pieces, or damp spots. If there’s a wet area, it’s a great indication of blockage and an indoor quality concern, which requires cleaning. But if some damage is present in your insulation or any mold problems, you should contact your trusted local technician for repairs. 

You want to try to feel some air movement around your duct seams to see if there is any leak. While you are testing for air leaks, seize the opportunity to also check for air duct insulation damages and wet spots.

How to Seal Your Air Ducts

If there is an obvious leak coming from the main ducts, you can repair it quite easily. Aluminum foil tapes and other heat-approving tapes are great for leaks on a flat surface where pieces of metal are joined together. When purchasing, better look for Underwriters Laboratory (UL) label. Before you do any work, grab your rag and make sure that the area is clean before applying either foil tape or mastic sealant.

After cleaning the surface, place a strip of the aluminum foil tape. After you have cleaned the surface, simply place a strip of the aluminum foil tape over the leak or use your mastic sealant and a paintbrush to seal it. Use the mastic sealant for leak areas that would be difficult to close with the foil tape. After all, mastic sealants are better compared to foil strips. 

If the problem persists and you think you can’t repair it on your own, it is best to find and call for repair services. We hope we’ve helped you!

How to Repair A Window Air Conditioner

Window air-conditioners are essential to make our homes cool and suit our comfort. Like other appliances, it needs maintenance and sometimes, they do not work as well as they did before. What can you do to repair your window air-conditioner if it poses some problems?

Here are some tips to help you out:

Get to Know Your AC Unit 

Make sure that you know your window air-conditioner before making a move. Check your user’s manual or surf the internet about it. Know about its model, type, parts, and functions. If you know enough, it will be easier for you to address its problem.   

Diagnose the Problem  

Look closely at your window air-conditioner. Observe if it makes too much noise, drips water indoors, does not make the environment cool enough, has trouble turning on or off, or other problems you might encounter. Doing this helps you know where to focus on and where to put in work.  

Clean the Unit 

Dirt and accumulated debris inside your air conditioning unit can cause problems. Sometimes, some units just need some thorough cleaning to work properly like it used to. Cleaning your unit is a must, not only for your air conditioner but for every device you have. For a device to run smoothly, its cleanliness must be maintained, too.

Lubricate the Motors 

Lubricating the motors will help your unit to run as smooth as ever. Any machine would need some oil from time to time. Do this as a part of maintenance.

Some Problems You Can Solve Yourself  

If your unit drips water toward the inside of your home, you only need to readjust its position. In this way, the pan beneath will catch the water and drip outside. This is a common problem some people can have but solving it is that easy! If your window air conditioner does not turn on, check if the unit is properly plugged then check if your outlet is working. If it still won’t work, read further to know what to do. If you feel like your unit does not make your room cool at all, most of the time all you have to do is clean it up. Consult your manual to know what tools or materials are safe to use for your unit. If this does nothing, then it’s time to call someone for help! 

Problems that Require a Professional 

When your window air-conditioner has trouble turning on, and the above solution did not work, check if its lights are turning on. If they do, the problem might be a faulty switch but if they don’t, then your unit might be overloaded. Do not attempt to repair this yourself for you might do more harm than good. If your unit does not make the room cool enough, and cleaning didn’t do any good, it might need to call an expert to recharge it with refrigerant and all will be good! Remember that your window air-conditioner, like your other appliances, needs to be taken care of. Take all of these guides to help repair your unit and your window air-conditioner will last for a long time!

If you still can’t repair your air conditioning unit on your own, it is best to call for experts and repair services. After all, they are the ones who are experienced in this kind of problem.